Advertisements

The long (and sometimes dangerous) walk to school 3/4J I stumbled upon this article and I was inspired to share it with you. We take walking to school for granted. We can ride our bike, walk or sometimes your parents will drop you off. For some children they do not have that luxury, they may be in war zones, tropical conditions or living a long distance from their school with no transport.

Read the article and answer the following questions in your book. You must have:

Title:

Author:

Sl1S:

Take a look at how other children get to school and how dangerous it is for them. Answer these questions:

1. Which image interests you and why?

2. Should the children be attending school in some of these conditions? Why or Why not?

3. If you had to choose one image and placed yourself as the student, which country would like to walk to school in? and Why? Explain by using evidence from the text your have read.

http://www.euronews.com/2015/06/02/the-long-and-sometimes-dangerous-walk-to-school/

I would like you to complete a Non Fiction reading marathon on the article. You will not be timed and I would be hope you could help Mr Childs with this. We have completed several and you can show him your examples in your reading response books.

Here is a reminder of your sections:

  1. Create a front cover if this article was a book.
  2. Write a list of questions you have about the topic.
  3. Draw a photo or illustration from the article.
  4. List interesting words and their their meaning from the article.
  5. Draw a diagram, Chart, Map, Graph, timeline or another photo.
  6. List 3 facts about the topic that you learnt from the article.

Here are some examples that my class has completed previously on this topic –

https://ourglobalclassroom.org/2014/09/03/sensational-reading-workshop-today-students-explore-how-students-travel-to-school/

Xu Liangfan, 37, escorts students on a cliff path as they make their way to Banpo Primary School in Shengji county, Bijie city in Guizhou province, China. Located halfway up a mountain, the school has 68 students of whom about 20 live in the nearby Gengguan village. Students from Gengguan have to edge their way along the narrow cliff path, the only available route, to go to class every day. Picture taken March 12, 2013. Students hold on to the side steel bars of a collapsed bridge as they cross a river to get to school in Lebak, Indonesia. Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001. Sofiah, a student crossing the bridge, says she will need to walk for an extra 30 minutes if she were to take a detour through another bridge REUTERS/Beawiharta Students hold on to the side steel bars of a collapsed bridge as they cross a river to get to school in Lebak, Indonesia. Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001. Sofiah, a student crossing the bridge, says she will need to walk for an extra 30 minutes if she were to take a detour through another bridge REUTERS/Beawiharta A school boy, carrying a backpack, walks past burning fuel tankers along the GT road in Nowshera, located in Pakistan’s Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province October 7, 2010. Schoolboys push their bicycles through a flooded road after heavy monsoon rains in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad July 4, 2013. REUTERS/Amit Dave Elementary school girls cross a river to go to school in the village of Nagari Koto Nan Tigo in Indonesia’s West Sumatra province, November 14, 2012. Schoolchildren from around 46 families in the village are forced to cross the river every day because there is no bridge, villagers say.

Advertisements